The billions of nerve network connections it took to write this blog happened across gaps.  That’s right, the synapse between neurons that allows communication between nerves (thought & action) is a chasm, crossed by ephemeral electricity or catalyst chemicals. 

Ironic that a substantive product can be created across nothingness.

There’s usually a gap – or a moment of choice –  in almost everything we do.  In recording the human voice, we call it a pause; a moment of possibilities that takes us to the next word and all its sublime nuance of personal decision.

Many’s the time I’ve constructed an opus email or Facebook response to offer a vehement counter-argument  — finger poised to click the mouse — only to pause in prudence. 

That gap…the pause…the moment hovering between alternative futures only an instant away, is nonetheless a crucial moment to be considered.

Paul Harvey — the so-called “Prince of the pregnant pause” — stretched that gap to the limits of allowable broadcast dead space…often leaving you wondering if you’d suddenly lost the signal.  What would he say next?… your anticipation whetted by the passing silent milliseconds — seemingly an eternity – only to find fulfillment as he recovered with the continuation of his thought.  But mind you… his pregnant pause made you all-the-more attentive to the VERY NEXT word he would utter.  He never disappointed.

...the pause...the moment hovering between alternative futures only an instant away, is nonetheless a crucial moment to be considered Click To Tweet

Make sure you don’t either, because pauses are a wonderful tool in your VO utterances. 

Similarly, hesitation is not always a bad thing in life decisions (or email flames).  In the gap lies choice, decision, and a chance for the better part of our humanity to sit on our shoulder and talk sense.  Even in headstrong split-decisions the gap is there.  

Will you listen to it?… or forge ahead, renouncing the pause (a no-less valid option at times).

My Monday musings.

…and now you know “the rest of the story”.

CourVO

 

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