newbieRemember that unbridled passion and energy you had when you decided to get into voice-acting?  I remember being almost giddy. 

Most days, those emotions still sustain me.  I’ve since added to it confidence, experience, wisdom, and something else that –honestly — can be a detriment:  pride.

Funny thing, pride.  It’s what sustains your ego, and having chutzpah is not always a bad thing as a voice actor.  But pride also gets in the way, ’cause it’s connected to status; and therein lies the trap.  Status can never be sustained merely with pride.

Not that you shouldn’t be proud of your accomplishments.  Celebrate them!  Just don’t perpetuate them.

When you see your voice-over business through the eyes of a newbie, you might just end up:

  • inviting over an audio specialist to tweak your audio chain (when’s the last time you did that?)
  • revamping your business plan
  • re-evaluating your potential and  the VO genres your capable of
  • generating a new demo
  • launching a new website
  • finding a new coach
  • attending a different conference
  • learning a new skill
  • making new friends

What one thing were you most certain was your VO dream when you first started out? What happened to that?  What got in the way?…or what worked to make it a reality?

If you could start all over again, what would you change?  Why can’t you change that now?

The newbie’s advantage:  they don’t yet know they can’t.
The professional’s disadvantage:  they don’t think they still can

CourVO

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