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…of a butte in Eastern Utah, I took this picture with a freaking iPhone and almost no sense of composition or framing.

To me, the scene is sublimely and quintessentially “Western”.  In reviewing the nearly 500 pictures I took in 10 days of vacationing, it is the one I keep coming back to.

My wife thinks a picture is wasted if there are no people in it.  So naturally she thinks THIS pic is the better one.  IMG_6811

I took this selfie in even more haste than the one from Eastern Utah.  But unless you know the people in the photo, it has little meaning.  That’s why I keep coming back to the sweeping vista from the American West; virtually everyone can relate to that.

BTW, I don’t count myself a photographer.  Still, the saying is true that the best camera to take a picture with is the one you have with you.

I’m sorry…I’m rambling.

Here’s the thing:  While I love people, and life is about relationships, there is a humbling quality about the Western pic that takes me out of myself.  The whole purpose of vacationing is to be away from the mundane and the routine, and find a distraction that delights you, and pulls you away from the familiar.   Right?  

The Utah picture does that.  

The surreal quality of the scene is oddly not validated by knowing I actually stood — in person — and viscerally experienced the landscape.  It’s THAT HARD for the mind to grasp the enormity of it…and therefore, it takes me out of myself…if even for a moment.

Pictures of me with people don’t do that.

Maybe it’s the introvert in me that needs the momentary diversion such a picture (and experience) provides.  Maybe I’m making no sense at all.  But I know I found satisfaction in being out of my routine standing on that butte.

We all need that.  A humbling moment to take us out of the self-important urgency that constitutes most of our work-days.

When’s the last time YOU did that?

I highly recommend it.  You don’t need a butte in Eastern Utah to find it.

CourVO

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