2015-06-10 10.26.15-smallerFew have sought the Holy Grail of mobile recording more than I.  Some of it is my love of technology, some is my perfectionism, and some has to do with ever-changing digital advances in size and capability.  Sadly, I’ve spent FAR more time worrying over such equipment, than actually using it (sigh)

And I’ve come to realize there IS no Holy Grail of motel-room audio recording configurations, but many many fine options.

That realization came from one of the high disciples of proper on-the-road technique:  Dan Lenard (also George Whittam, Dan Friedman, and others), who long preached that the recording environment was just as, if not more important than the quality of your equipment.

To that end, and further complicating the ultimate portable recording set-up, was the entry into the market of products like the Porta-Booth Pro, Kaotica Eyeball, and Vocal Booth to Go.   Adding these elements only grows the bag of goods you end up carting around with your other suitcase, though, and falls outside the scope of our WoVOChat this week.

The challenge, then, becomes matching what you bring to the hotel room, as well as adapting what you FIND in the room to construct your recording environment.  Pillows?  Ironing board?  Luggage rack? 

We’re going to share all that, plus we hope to capitalize on the collective wisdom of our participants as we tackle the topic of Travel Kits, “Away” Recording on the next WoVOChat this Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at noon, Pacific.

Our WoVO Pro guests are the well-traveled Brad Venable and Liz de Nesnera. As always, our chat architect and moderator is WoVO Pro and content marketing specialist Pamela Muldoon.  I’ll be along as host and gadfly.  🙂

Anyone and everyone who sees this is invited to join.  We like Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, tchat.io, and Tweetchat.com as best interfaces to join the fun.  It all lasts for one hour, and never ceases to amaze in the amount of wisdom shared.

This go-round, we’ll be talking about whether XLR or USB mics are best…what DAW or tablet is good to record on, and what software to use.  Whether it’s best to bring a pre-amp, or use a MicPortPro.  What clients expect regardless of WHERE you record, and whether the quality of your remote recording should try to match your home studio.  All that is just scratching the surface of the direction this chat can go.

Join us?

CourVO

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