listening-aIn the middle of rushing through the commercial spot-sets in my DVR-recorded version of the latest episode of “Breaking Bad” I insisted my wife stop scooting through the ads, and let me listen.  She thought I was nuts, but she understands.  She doesn’t like it, but after having explained it to her umpteen times, — she understands.

This comes under the heading of “obvious but often ignored”:  Make a POINT of critically listening to all the radio and TV commercials you possibly can.

Sure, I understand the wisdom of perusing through the many professional demos on VoiceBank.  Absolutely.  Do that.  Your demo will be better for it.

But don’t ignore the immutable fact that the spots playing on the air in your favorite shows on TV, and on today’s best radio stations are the REAL WORLD.  Those spots were bought and paid for.  Someone wrote them, an agent casted them, a voice-actor recorded them, and an audio engineer produced them.  It’s not a demo.  Whatever the voice-actor was doing there, got them the job.

The spots you hear on the air today are the best measure of:

  • the VO delivery that gets work
  • the trends advertisers are paying attention to
  • the sound that’s current
  • the pitch bringing in consumers
  • the style clients are paying for

So, forget whether Walter White lives or dies… pay attention to what company bought the spots in this award-winning show;  how was that ad positioned;  who voiced it — and how;  and what was the style…the sound…the approach.  THAT’s what you should be listening for.

Then go audition THAT with the experience and sound that only YOU can bring to the spot.

CourVO

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