How will the rest of the world see you?
What is your “look”?
How do you want to be perceived?
What kind of first impression will you make?

When you consider BRAND, these are some of the questions that you’ll ponder (along with others — I do not profess to be a branding expert).

There’s more that goes into a brand of course, especially in voice overs.  But when you do business cards, when you design a website, when you consider what your email signature will look like…you start thinking about finding a logo and a tag line, and putting it all together in a nice neat little rectangle, or square, or circle, etc.

What colors will you use, what font, what picture (if any)?…how should it appear?

These are all rhetorical questions, of course, but lately I’ve been getting LOTS of examples of how Voice Actors want to be perceived.

In the rush to launch National Voice Over Month, I promised to place the logo of any supporter on the home page of the NVOM site.  I’ve been doing that over and over again, thanks to the enthusiastic support of many VO companies and individuals.

What has emerged is a colorful tapestry of logos and brand statements.  Have you looked?  Do you have a favorite?  How does yours stack up against the others?  Did you get some ideas seeing all the different offerings?  What works?  What doesn’t?

Take a look now if you haven’t lately.  I added two more logos last night.  I find it fascinating to see the spectrum.  Yes, there are some microphones.  There are very few faces.  Some have slogans, others have website URL’s.  Some are no-nonsense, others are artistically or aesthetically pleasing.

Here’s the question, though:  Which ones WORK?  Which ones achieve the owner’s intent?  Which ones truly extend a memorable brand worthy of what the voice actor hopes to impress upon the seeker?

CourVO

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